The Supreme Court’s latest immigration ruling formalizes terror against Latinos

Allowing the indefinite detention of any immigrant to America undermines the constitutional rights of all of us. The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Jennings v. Rodriguez on Tuesday is a bizarre and dark new development in the American experiment. Not only because it’s a breakdown of the court’s ability to properly interpret the constitution (as they formally…

What happens to deportees back in Mexico? One group is offering a hand.

No governmental agencies in the U.S. or abroad are tracking the whereabouts of people after they’re deported, says New Comienzos founder Israel Concha.   MEXICO CITY — In the area known as Little Los Angeles, in the Tabacalera neighborhood of Mexico City, some passersby may not know what goes on in the nondescript white building…

Cultural Legibility in America’s Dark Chapter

In Jiayang Fan’s recent article, “Buried Words,” which appeared earlier this month in the New Yorker, Fan asks: How literal must a literary translation be? Fan ponders the case of Han Kang’s Man Booker International Prize-winning novel, The Vegetarian, the first Korean-language novel to win the prize, which Kang shared with Deborah Smith who translated the work into English. In the wake of…

What We Talk About When We Talk About Humanizing People In Literature

In the wake of the recent Supreme Court decision ruling that immigrants, documented or not, can be detained indefinitely without right to a bond hearing, I’ve been thinking a lot about the crystallization of an American second class and the way we produce and consume narratives about class and race generally in contemporary American literature. Specifically, what…

Inking Well: An Interview With Jasminne Mendez

If you’re at all alive in the Houston arts scene, chances are you’ve crossed paths with Jasminne Mendez in one of her capacities: as a poet, as an actor, as an educator, as a podcast host, or as a community organizer and programmer (sometimes all of these things in a single day). She’s one-half of…

Trauma and Humanity in Lion Cross Point

In Masatsugu Ono’s novel Lion Cross Point (Two Lines Press), his first to be translated into English, the opening lines come to us from the voice of the protagonist’s mother, Wakako. “I hated it. Detested it. I just wanted to get away as soon as I could.” For Takeru, his mother’s voice, filtered through memory, comes to him…